Articles and Announcements

Upcoming Events

Menu
Log in


FELLOW TRAVELERS

Other sites and groups who have supported Reacting to the Past, for those looking for more educational and gaming experiences.







42 Educational Games Coaching and Design (“42EdGames”) is a for-profit, service disabled veteran owned small business that helps higher education faculty and corporate educators incorporate games-based learning into their respective spaces. 42EdGames supports the Reacting Community by:

  • Promoting the use of Reacting Games in classrooms
  • Coordinating through the Reacting Editorial Board to provide limited Development Editor Support to games in work
  • Providing paid Development Editor support directly to authors via grant funding or other financial resources
  • Promotional Support to Reacting events such as the Game Development Conference
 You can learn more about 42EdGames here.



Wishcraft Simulations is a company devoted to writing and designing cinematic educational simulations. Our projects include the Situation Room Experience, a National Archives project now running at the Reagan and George W. Bush Presidential Libraries, as well as the Situation Room Experience: Washington's Cabinet now running at George Washington's Mount Vernon.

You can also learn more about Wishcraft here.



Dr. Liz Davidson is a board game reviewer, Latin teacher, and host of the Beyond Solitaire podcast, where she and her guests explore challenging issues related to board gaming. Previous episodes have focused on professional wargaming, historical game design, and the use of games in educational settings—which means she has interviewed several Reacting to the Past luminaries! In addition to her podcast, Liz maintains a YouTube channel, Beyond Solitaire, where she covers solo board games and posts additional interviews with game designers. 

Beyond Solitaire YouTube

Beyond Solitaire Podcast


The Center for Learning through Games and Simulations at Central Michigan University promotes the use of games, simulations, and play in learning. The use of games facilitates an active-learning agenda with a high level of student engagement. The goal is to have the students learn course material while simultaneously building skills in leadership, public speaking, critical thinking, problem-solving and analysis.

Children often learn skills faster through play than most other methods. Somewhere between childhood and becoming an adult our society has made learning a chore rather than a pastime. Go to any college campus and you will find students constantly learning through play. In a game of ultimate Frisbee, for example, college students will learn new ways to throw a Frisbee to help their team win. The purpose of this institute is to bring play and fun into the classroom thereby facilitating a greater enjoyment of learning and better retention of the material.

Goals

  • Make learning fun.
  • Promote leadership.
  • Broaden student experience.
  • Apply information to real-world problems.
  • Promote interdisciplinarity.
  • Learn through informal settings/play.
  • Understand complex problems.
  • Understand human agency, choice, and contingency.

You can learn more about the Center for Learning Through Games and Simulations here.


This website is still in beta.  Please email us with feedback and ideas. Thank you for your patience and understanding.  

You may know us as RTTP Reacting to the Past educational games gamification simulations classroom simulations case studies case study method history historical role-playing role playing games LARP ing role play games for education help me be a better professor college professor alternatives to lectures active learning active-learning learning activities energize your classroom best practices AHA the chronicle teaching learning center teaching excellence public speaking  promote metacognition emotional intelligence teach empathy student agency what is Reacting to the Past the Reacting Consortium immersive role-playing games  educational debate debating economic simulations historical simulation model UN 

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software